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Matthew 12:40

Willy

Pro Poster
I had a dream that we were all home with the Lord and happy and all things answered and explained and I was resting in the joy of it all … and then, … out of the corner of my eye I spotted a note posted on a prominent notice board in the middle of the main square and as I approached the note I could make out the author and it was you “rstrats” and in that note you were still trying to … and I started screaming ...no … no … NOOOO ….. not here too …

:aah:
 

rstrats

Getting Started
Willy,
re: "That's the least of what you missed..."

What ever it was, it's an issue for another topic. This one is concerned with one thing and only one thing, i.e., examples which show instances of where a daytime or a night time was forecast or said to be involved with an event when no part of a daytime or no part of a night time could have occurred.
 

rstrats

Getting Started
And again, that "someone new" needs to be someone who believes the crucifixion took place on the 6th day of the week with a 1st day of the week resurrection, and who thinks that the "heart of the earth" is referring to the tomb, and who tries to explain the lack of a 3rd night by saying that the Messiah was employing common figure of speech/colloquial language of the period.
 

rstrats

Getting Started
CoreIssue,
re: "Paradise off the Pit."

I don't know what that means.

BTW, you still have questions directed to you in post numbers 32, 43, 47, 56 and 62.
 

rstrats

Getting Started
CoreIssue,
re: "Were the three days and three nights that Jesus was in the grave a full 72 hours?"

That would be an issue for a different topic.
 

CoreIssue

Administrator
Staff member
You are very confusing. Jesus was removed from the cross and put in the grave and the eve of the Sabbath, which is Friday. He spent the whole Sabbath in the grave. He rose on the morning of the first day of the week, which is Sunday.
 

rstrats

Getting Started
CoreIssue,
re: "You are very confusing. Jesus was removed from the cross and put in the grave and the eve of the Sabbath, which is Friday. He spent the whole Sabbath in the grave. He rose on the morning of the first day of the week, which is Sunday."

And again, that is an issue for a different topic. This one is concerned with one issue and only one issue, i.e., the commonality of forecasting or saying that a daytime or a night time would be involved with an event when no part of a daytime or no part of a night time could occur.
 

rstrats

Getting Started
There was part or all of Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Even if the crucifixion took place on the 6th day of the week - and there is no consensus that it did - that would only be one example.

By the way, you wrote in post #12 that you are not a 6th day advocate. Now it appears that you are. What changed your mind?
 

Willy

Pro Poster
Good morning rstrats,

This might help address the right days question … it seems in 325 CE the Christian Council of Nicaea established that Easter would be held on the first Sunday after the first full moon occurring on or after equinox on March 21. Previously it had been held coinciding with the Passover Feasts.

https://en.shalomfromg-d.net/2017/04/10/passover-jesus-and-jewish-questions/

Here it is from Britannica (Council of Nicaea 325 CE)

https://www.britannica.com/event/First-Council-of-Nicaea-325

Paschal controversies, in the Christian Church, disputes concerning the correct date for observing Easter (Greek Pascha). The earliest controversy was over the question of whether Easter should always be celebrated on a Sunday or on the actual day of the Jewish lunar month (14th of Nisan) on which the Paschal lamb was slaughtered. The latter practice, followed by the church in the Roman province of Asia, was generally condemned at the end of the 2nd century because it meant celebrating Easter when the Jews were keeping Passover.
 

Willy

Pro Poster
This might help address the right days question …
It might. But that would be an issue for a different topic. Perhaps you might start one.
You are wrong. Your question was answered. The very fact that the council changed the dates makes your question moot.

There never was a problem with the number of days because at the start the Church celebrated Easter in parallel with the Jewish celebration of Passover. Originally there was no problem with having the right number of days.
 
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