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Hot Air Engine

Discussion in 'Creative, Hobby and Skills Forum' started by InTheWind, Dec 9, 2009.

  1. InTheWind

    InTheWind Pro Poster

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    I built this hot air engine from scratch, it`s a exact replica of a 1860 Ryder Ericsson water pumping engine.
    Also called Stirling cycle, they were used for pumping water. I built six full size engines of different makes.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. InTheWind

    InTheWind Pro Poster

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    This one is a replica of a Bramen engine orignaly made in Bremen Ohio.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. InTheWind

    InTheWind Pro Poster

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    And a full size replica of a toy Weeden steam engine, toy is in front.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. CoreIssue

    CoreIssue Administrator Staff Member

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    As always, great work! :D
     
  5. City

    City Pro Poster

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    Those are really interesting!
     
  6. InTheWind

    InTheWind Pro Poster

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    Thanks, these are old pics that I have stored , thought I had posted them before but couldn`t find them.
    Was bored so thought i`d re-post them. :D
     
  7. Willy

    Willy Pro Poster

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  8. InTheWind

    InTheWind Pro Poster

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    I made all the parts except the fly wheel and water pump on the ryder.
    The ones from the 1800`s only had enough power to pump water, in the 70` they were building car sterling engins that pruduced 80 hp or more but we know what happened to those. :( oil companies

    I`ve built many steam engines and have hooked generators to them, i`ve found out the hard way that you can`t get something for nothing. The closest and best thing to free power imo is water power.
     
  9. CTZonEdit

    CTZonEdit Site Administrator Staff Member

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    Its always amazing to me to see the work you can do. Its just awesome to me you have the patience and skills to work metal into wonderful things.
     
  10. InTheWind

    InTheWind Pro Poster

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    Thanks bro, haven`t built anything new for a while as far as engines go.
     
  11. roman8

    roman8 Advanced Poster

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    Pretty neat ITW, do they, or are they going to function, or are they just for fun?
     
  12. InTheWind

    InTheWind Pro Poster

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    Thanks roman8, the hot air engines are fully functional, I used to take all my engines to one of those farm threashing shows and display them. At the time that I built the engines (1994) me and another old feller were the only two people in the country building full size hot air engines so they were quite the thing.
    I built six engines and my friend built more than that, he passed away a few years ago and I got into other things so they just sat around gathering dust. The Ryder is the only hot air engine I have left. John Erricson was quite a guy, he built the all steel ship the monitor during the civil war. He built a ship that had hot air engines powering it, there were four cylinders each being 16 foot across and a eight foot stroke, they say they would stand on the pistons and ride up and down.
     
  13. City

    City Pro Poster

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    Really?... That would be fun... possibly slightly dangerous?

    My dad goes to tractor shows a lot and theres always a lot there.

    Are the engines heavy?
     
  14. InTheWind

    InTheWind Pro Poster

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  15. InTheWind

    InTheWind Pro Poster

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    My memory of the figures of the ship engine were incorrect, here is the facts from a article.

    Ericsson settled in New York where he built, between 1840 to 1850, eight experimental engines using wire gauze regenerators. These engines worked on an open cycle with external heating and using two pistons of unequal diameters.
    In 1851 Ericsson persuaded his financial backers to build the Caloric Ship Ericsson. A 260 foot paddle ship powered by a four cylinder caloric engine. Each cylinder was 168 inches in diameter with a 6 foot stoke. The ship was not a success, and unfortunately for Ericsson it sank in storm off New York. On being raised the Ericsson was fitted with steam engines. These steam engines were later removed and the ship continued in service as a sailing vessel until 1898 when it was driven ashore in a storm, off the west coast of Canada.
     
  16. InTheWind

    InTheWind Pro Poster

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  17. InTheWind

    InTheWind Pro Poster

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    Pic of one of the large gas engines i used to have, it`s a 10 HP. Fairbanks and Morris.

    [​IMG]
     

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